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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 28  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 120-124

Ocular open globe injuries at workplace among domestic migrant laborers in the Angamaly–Perumbavoor belt of Kerala


Department of Ophthalmology, Little Flower Hospital and Research Centre, Angamaly, Kerala, India

Correspondence Address:
Sanitha Sathyan
Department of Ophthalmology, Little Flower Hospital and Research Centre, Angamaly, Kerala
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/kjo.kjo_1_17

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Aim: To analyze the pattern of workplace ocular open globe injuries affecting domestic migrant laborers (DML) in the Angamaly–Perumbavoor belt of Ernakulam district. Materials and Methods: Retrospective analysis of medical records of migrant laborers who suffered from ocular open globe injuries sustained at workplace and treated at a tertiary care ophthalmic hospital during the period June 2011 to June 2016 was performed. Results: Fifty eyes of 48 DML in the Angamaly–Perumbavoor belt, with ocular open globe injuries sustained at workplace were included in the study. Mean age of the participants was 27.18 ± 8.5 years. Fifteen (30%) patients belonged to the 18–22 age group; 13 (26%) belonged to the 22–26 age group. Most common mode of open globe injury was injury with flying metal piece (46%) followed by injury with stone (36%). Thirty-eight (74%) had rupture of globe, 10 (20%) had penetrating injury, 2 (4%) patients had intraocular foreign body, and 1 (2%) had perforating injury. According to the Ocular Trauma Score Classification, 30 (61%) had Zone 1 injuries, 14 (29%) had Zone 2 injuries, and 5 (10%) had Zone 3 injuries. Grade 3 injuries accounted for 23 (46%) cases, followed by Grade 4 injuries in 16 (32%). The follow-up data and long-term visual outcomes of ocular globe injury in DML could not be analyzed as there was a high percentage of patients who were lost to follow up. Twenty-nine (58%) were of patients who were lost to follow-up after 1 month post surgery, 16 (32%) patients were lost to follow-up after 3 months, and follow up records beyond 6 months were available only for 5 (10%) patients. Conclusion: The prevalence of open globe injuries among migrant labourers in Kerala is high. The clinical findings indicate that most of them are serious sight threatening injuries. Socioeconomic and legal factors involved in these cases need to be addressed.


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